Thoughts on Redwall

1. Browsing the Redwall tag launches me fifteen years into the past. It’s like visiting home after a long time away, or hearing from a dear friend after too long.

There was always something very homey about those books. You knew the characters easily (every hare being, after all, a hare, and every mouse a mouse), the environments were soft and familiar, and the food—ah! Redwall food holds a special place in the heart of everyone, I think, who read the books as a child.

There was also an easy, comforting format to the stories. They were different enough that I was always eager to devour the next book, but similar enough that I never felt surprised or out-of-place. I know some people complain about the stock structure, but I think there’s a spot for it in this world. One of those places is Redwall Abbey and the woods of Mossflower.

2. Browsing the Redwall tag is hilarious, because it is dozens of posts with photos of birds and rodents, fanart of mice in armor, quotes and poems and recipes from the series…

Interspersed, charmingly, with the occasional photo of an actual red wall.

earthstory
earthstory:

To celebrate his birthday and commemorate his life, here is the story of Carl Sagan’s Golden Record. This is a photo of the “Golden Record” which is attached to both Voyager 1 & 2. It is a time capsule of sorts, intended to communicate the story of our species and our home planet to extraterrestrials. A similar plaque was attached to Voyager’s predecessors, Pioneer 10 and 11; but the golden record contains a much more whole and ambitious message. The Voyager message is carried by a phonograph record, a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. The contents of the record were selected for NASA by a panel chaired by none other than Dr Carl Sagan. Sagan and his associates assembled 115 images and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind and thunder, birds, whales, and other animals. To this they added musical selections from different cultures and eras, and spoken greetings from humans spoken in fifty-five languages.  The record, like the plaques on Pioneer 10 and 11, also contains information about our Solar Systems location in the form of Sagan’s “pulsar map” which shows the position of our Sun utilising 14 pulsars of known directions. A binary code defines the frequency of the pulses.  Also included is a diagram which illustrates the lowest states of the hydrogen atom (hydrogen being the most abundant gas). The vertical lines with the dots indicate the spin of the proton and the electron.  Both the Voyager spacecrafts have left our solar system since 1990 and now they find themselves in empty space. It will be forty thousand years before they make a close approach to any other planetary system.  The likelihood of anyone finding this token, and understanding it is slim- but the idea behind it is lovely and is summed up well in President Jimmy Carter’s message on the record: “We cast this message into the cosmos… If one such civilization intercepts Voyager and can understand these recorded contents, here is our message: We are trying to survive our time so we may live into yours… This record represents our hope and our determination and our goodwill in a vast and awesome universe.” A true “Earth Story”. I hope you enjoy the idea as much as I do. -Jean Image courtesy of NASA. Many other pieces of information, including a diagram of the naked human form; both male and female, appear on the Golden Record, but I have not gone into detail; this website is amazing and goes through everything: http://goldenrecord.org/

earthstory:

To celebrate his birthday and commemorate his life, here is the story of Carl Sagan’s Golden Record.

This is a photo of the “Golden Record” which is attached to both Voyager 1 & 2. It is a time capsule of sorts, intended to communicate the story of our species and our home planet to extraterrestrials. A similar plaque was attached to Voyager’s predecessors, Pioneer 10 and 11; but the golden record contains a much more whole and ambitious message. The Voyager message is carried by a phonograph record, a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth.

The contents of the record were selected for NASA by a panel chaired by none other than Dr Carl Sagan. Sagan and his associates assembled 115 images and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind and thunder, birds, whales, and other animals. To this they added musical selections from different cultures and eras, and spoken greetings from humans spoken in fifty-five languages.

The record, like the plaques on Pioneer 10 and 11, also contains information about our Solar Systems location in the form of Sagan’s “pulsar map” which shows the position of our Sun utilising 14 pulsars of known directions. A binary code defines the frequency of the pulses.

Also included is a diagram which illustrates the lowest states of the hydrogen atom (hydrogen being the most abundant gas). The vertical lines with the dots indicate the spin of the proton and the electron.

Both the Voyager spacecrafts have left our solar system since 1990 and now they find themselves in empty space. It will be forty thousand years before they make a close approach to any other planetary system.

The likelihood of anyone finding this token, and understanding it is slim- but the idea behind it is lovely and is summed up well in President Jimmy Carter’s message on the record:

“We cast this message into the cosmos… If one such civilization intercepts Voyager and can understand these recorded contents, here is our message: We are trying to survive our time so we may live into yours… This record represents our hope and our determination and our goodwill in a vast and awesome universe.”

A true “Earth Story”. I hope you enjoy the idea as much as I do.

-Jean

Image courtesy of NASA.

Many other pieces of information, including a diagram of the naked human form; both male and female, appear on the Golden Record, but I have not gone into detail; this website is amazing and goes through everything: http://goldenrecord.org/

The Instax Mini90 is officially the funnest camera I’ve ever had.  Tiny instant pictures!  Easy double exposure!  (Relatively) cheap film!

I used to do some double-exposure finagling with Polaroid filmpacks, and (while fun), it was a lot of effort—making a false frame, inserting it (without exposing any of the other film!), and crossing your fingers that it would work.

By contrast, the Mini90 has an easy-access double exposure mode.  Oh, technology.  How far we come and go!

thriftshophell
thriftshophell:

Fluffy.  Thrift Shop Hell, 2014.
This is a perfect example of the “bit of fluff” category of figurine. 
A well-placed bit of fluff can catapult almost any ceramic animal from the merely “odd” into the “deeply catastrophic.”

Bonus Awful Points if the fluff is actually the fur of a dead rabbit. (It’s not, in this particular case. But it often is.)
Prints and greeting cards with this image are available here.

thriftshophell:

Fluffy.  Thrift Shop Hell, 2014.

This is a perfect example of the “bit of fluff” category of figurine. 

A well-placed bit of fluff can catapult almost any ceramic animal from the merely “odd” into the “deeply catastrophic.”

Bonus Awful Points if the fluff is actually the fur of a dead rabbit. (It’s not, in this particular case. But it often is.)

Prints and greeting cards with this image are available here.

bookwar
ryannorth:

davidmalki:

Ryan North has had a lot of fun lately making up book covers about me and the Star Tracks, but do you want to know what I think?
I think he’s just jealous because he can’t enjoy a piece of media without obsessively noticing, and then cataloging, every usage of English grammar that varies even the slightest from some imaginary perfect standard he’s obsessed with! Ryan, you have a DEGREE IN LINGUISTICS. I’d think you, OF ALL PEOPLE, would take a descriptivist view of language! But just check out THIS TRUE EXCERPT from this book I found in an abandoned nautical library:

Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Season 1 (1983)
Episode 1:
1:31: Amanda King: “I’ll be right back thank you dear” – Run-on sentence.
4:22: Amanda King: “Man in the red hat…man in the red hat.” – Sentence fragment.
10:48: Amanda King: “You certainly will not!” – Sentence fragment.
16:03: Lee Stetson: “Champagne?” – Sentence fragment.
16:59: Lee Stetson: “I’m sorry that this is…” – Sentence fragment.
17:37: Amanda King: “I just almost did the dumbest thing with your package.” – Awkward phrasing.
27:31: Amanda King: “Valley Forge flapjacks, pilgrim’s peach puff.” – Sentence fragment.

And on and on and on like this for – according to the cover – every piece of fiction between 1960 and 2010!
Let me tell you people: the type in this book is TINY
[ BOOKWAR ]

Um, actually, the “who” versus “whom” thing depends on whether the person being referred to is the subject or the object of the verb, so without a larger context it’s impossible to say which is correct??
THAT SAID, this book looks amazing and I would be proud to have it on my bookshelf, much less be credited as author.


Can I just point out to anyone whose life has not yet been filled with joy that BOOKWAR is a thing, and it is a thing (even better!) that you can follow on the Internet.

ryannorth:

davidmalki:

Ryan North has had a lot of fun lately making up book covers about me and the Star Tracks, but do you want to know what I think?

I think he’s just jealous because he can’t enjoy a piece of media without obsessively noticing, and then cataloging, every usage of English grammar that varies even the slightest from some imaginary perfect standard he’s obsessed with! Ryan, you have a DEGREE IN LINGUISTICS. I’d think you, OF ALL PEOPLE, would take a descriptivist view of language! But just check out THIS TRUE EXCERPT from this book I found in an abandoned nautical library:

Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Season 1 (1983)

Episode 1:

1:31: Amanda King: “I’ll be right back thank you dear” – Run-on sentence.

4:22: Amanda King: “Man in the red hat…man in the red hat.” – Sentence fragment.

10:48: Amanda King: “You certainly will not!” – Sentence fragment.

16:03: Lee Stetson: “Champagne?” – Sentence fragment.

16:59: Lee Stetson: “I’m sorry that this is…” – Sentence fragment.

17:37: Amanda King: “I just almost did the dumbest thing with your package.” – Awkward phrasing.

27:31: Amanda King: “Valley Forge flapjacks, pilgrim’s peach puff.” – Sentence fragment.

And on and on and on like this for – according to the cover – every piece of fiction between 1960 and 2010!

Let me tell you people: the type in this book is TINY

[ BOOKWAR ]

Um, actually, the “who” versus “whom” thing depends on whether the person being referred to is the subject or the object of the verb, so without a larger context it’s impossible to say which is correct??

THAT SAID, this book looks amazing and I would be proud to have it on my bookshelf, much less be credited as author.

Can I just point out to anyone whose life has not yet been filled with joy that BOOKWAR is a thing, and it is a thing (even better!) that you can follow on the Internet.